Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Read The Book Your Kids Read Because It's Fun

Both kids read this and I am almost too late to the party.
Wonder, by R.J. Palacio, was an excellent tale of a fifth-grader with birth defects.

Both my daughter and son read this and were moved by the story. My son is now in the fifth grade, so I can refer to Wonder to illustrate the various points parents usually emphasize.

The story is about a boy, August, who initially was home schooled but decides to give a New York prep school a try. This is fiction, which allows the story to be told from multiple characters' first-person.

There is a sister, parents, school administrators, bullies, friends, allies, and intrigue appropriate to the grade level. All the Star Wars references check-out which gives the writing verisimilitude. The social struggles, which make up the main narrative engine, were gripping and appropriate.

The best writing makes the reader feel that he/she inhabits the life of the characters depicted. This succeeds and if there is a lesson to be gleaned from the book it is one of empathy, delivered in a non-preachy manner.

My 10-year-old picked up that the real villain was not Julian, the boy who socially isolates August, but rather his mother, who refuses to confront her son's bad behavior. Palacio has empathy both for the bully and bullied as they are both only 10-years old.

A truly enjoyable read!





1 comment:

  1. their blow dryers, use their laptop computers, light their rooms at night, and feel safe in their cities. Nuclear power has been harnessed to make devastating bombs do glue traps work?

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